In the final lesson of this unit of the course you will learn some useful phrases including “Happy Christmas”, “Good Luck” and “I love you”!

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    21 replies to "Lesson 10 – One Minute Russian"

    • Mari

      Thank you so much for these lessons. I tried them with my Russian friend and she was really impressed that I could say some things in Russian and complemented on my pronunciation. Your work is appreciated please continue.
      Thank you from Brazil!

    • arbhor

      Last Lesson? Really?

    • Gill

      Pity there are only 10 lessons I wish there were more they are fantastic.

    • Albert Romo

      Please, please bring back One Minute Russian…it is absolutely fantastic. I’ve benefited greatly from it and my Russian friends are so happy to hear me speaking to them in Russian.

    • Albert Romo

      Please, please bring back One Minute Russian…it is absolutely fantastic. I’ve benefited greatly from it and my Russian friends are so happy to hear me speaking to them in Russian.

    • ray

      I really enjoyed learning Russian with One minute Russian. I wish there is a longer series of Russian lessons like a Coffe Break Russian, for example.

    • Laura Luxenberg

      I would very much like more of ‘One Minute Russian’. Ann was great. I would like even more a Coffee Break Russian series.
      Anything in the works for either?
      Thank you much,
      LL

    • Cay

      Please, please please – coffee break Russian next. Ann is a legend and we all need to learn more!

    • Paula

      Another vote for Coffee Break Russian. With Enhanced podcasts too. How about it, Mark?

    • Catherine

      Wow, it’s really interesting to hear my native language here) I think it’s a great podcast for beginners, “One minute Russian” is a great start)

    • jim

      I have been really struggling with Russian lessons and found these basic introductory podcasts excellent. More lessons or deeper courses would be great, because the style is very clear and at a perfect level for beginners.

    • Vladimir

      Guys, I’ve really enjoed the “Coffee Break Spanish” and checked out the course on my native language… The girl’s accent is not even Slavic!!! Now I do not trust your other resources 🙁 I’ve asked your helpdesk three days ago and did not get any answer, so I leave it here. Is it so hard to find a native speaker to say ten phrases?!

      • radiolingua radiolingua

        Vladimir, I’ve replied to your email (apologies for the delay on that!), but in the interests of other readers, I thought it would be useful to reply here too.

        We do aim to use native speakers on most of our podcasts, in particular the One Minute Languages series. We are, however, a small company based in the West of Scotland, and it’s not always possible to get access to native speakers. As it happens One Minute Russian was recorded in the very early days of the company and we worked with an experienced Russian teacher from Scotland who has spent several years living and working in various parts of Russia. We do hope eventually to replace Ann’s input in this course with a native speaker, but of course this will depend on our finding a native Russian speaker with a neutral accent who is able to record with us, ideally here in the west of Scotland.

        With regard to other languages, many of our courses do involve native speakers. The exceptions are the Coffee Break courses and the My Daily Phrase courses, again all of which started at the very early stages of our company. Putting My Daily Phrase Italian and German to one side for a moment (as we’re already re-recording these courses with native speakers), we have discussed the Coffee Break courses on many occasions on our website, discussion boards, and on other blogs and review sites. Coffee Break Spanish and Coffee Break French are both presented by me – I am an experienced teacher of both French and Spanish and have lived and worked in France and Spain over many years. My French and Spanish accents have been commented on favourably many times by native speakers on the various reviews that the podcasts have had. There is always a great deal of discussion as to the value of learning from a native speaker. With Coffee Break Spanish and Coffee Break French we are presenting language-learning in a slow, gradual way, and the use of a non-native but fluent and accurate speaker means that the learners listening to the materials can aspire to acquiring the same level of language as their non-native teacher. Equally, a non-native teacher who has learned the language himself to a very high level can understand exactly the difficulties of other non-natives in acquiring the language.

        I hope this helps to answer your query. If anyone else has any thoughts please contribute to the discussion!

    • radiolingua radiolingua

      Just another thought here – the aim of the One Minute courses is to help listeners acquire the absolute basics of a language, enough to make themselves understood by a native speaker and to demonstrate a level of willingness and intercultural understanding. If any learner says any of the phrases included in One Minute Russian, emulating the accent of the teacher on the course, then I’m certain that the native speakers will simply be delighted at this effort, rather than comment on the accuracy of the accent used.

    • Jim

      Great fun, this. Can we have some more? Please? Pretty please.
      Go on…

    • Kim

      Would also love to see a Coffee Break Russian. The One Minute series was brilliant however I feel I could benefit from longer sessions so that the tricker words that I’ve learnt could be broken down into pieces then joined together to improve pronunciation.

    • Charles

      In contrast to Vladimirs opinion, I should like to comment that the fact that Ann is a native English speaker with fluent Russian language, greatly enhances the quality of her lessons. We understand her better, can repeat her words better and feel much more comfortable learning the language.
      There exist other podcasts etc for learning Russian, most of them with native Russian speakers – and they cannot even compare with Ann’s lessons.
      We do not need “slavic” accents, Moscovite ones even less where “o” is pronounced like “a” etc etc.

      I speak fluent French, German, Dutch and Spanish with Paris, Hamburg, Rotterdam, Barcelona accents included and couldn’t even try to compete with Ann’s easy entry into a new language.

      I would love to have coffee break Russian from Ann and would have no problem in paying for the service.

      Tell Ann we want more from her!

      very best regards from Barcelona
      Charles

    • Julia

      Hi!
      Well-done! Except one thing: we do not say “Na zdorovje” meaning “Cheers”. We say “Za zdorovje”! “Na zdorovje” means rather “You are welcome” or similar, e.g. when you get a piece of cake and you say “Thanks a lot”, the answer you get can be “Na zdorovje!” Although I hear this wrong expression all the time and got almost used to it, I’d be happy to hear the right one instead 😉

      Coffee Break Spanish is awesome btw 🙂

      Cheers,
      Julia

    • Roman

      It’s very cool that there is interest in the Russian language, it is very cool, Russian – wonderful people! But the accent of Ann’s too strong …

      Well, at least so – and it’s good! :))))

      I wish you all the best!!!!

    • Olga

      Dear Ann, Thank you very much! Your language lessons are perfect!
      I think that it’s doesnt matter that Ann is not Russian native speaker, – I’m Russian and I’m the teacher of Russian language for foreigners and I think that Ann pronounce very clear so that all non-native speakers could understand Russian basics

      Thank you !

    • Salvis

      Ann’s russian is very good and would be understood, except of being native, may be. I am latvian speaking fluently both russian and english. But I landed on this site because I’m learning spanish 🙂 And what surprised me most, that Ann has accent even in english or at least what I’ve heard living in London for a couple years 🙂 May be it is because she is from Scottland, that would explain.

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