Many words of French origin have become common place in the English language but in many cases the original meaning gets changed or lost along the way.

Which words can you think of that are used in English but were originally French? Is the meaning the same in both languages? If you want to go a stage further, we’d love for you to do un peu de recherches about the origins of one of the words you’ve chosen and then partager ce que vous avez trouvé with the rest of the Coffee Break French community by posting it in a comment here.

To start you off, you may want to think about cuisine, rendez-vous or chic.

On vous laisse y réfléchir mais n’oubliez pas de nous laisser un commentaire avec votre réponse!

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    1 Response to "Newsletter Activity 9 – word origins"

    • Paul

      Salut,

      Le mot que j’ai recherché est “Volume”.

      This word begin meaning “a book or scroll” late 14c (France)., “roll of parchment containing writing; a bound book,” from volvere “to turn around, roll”.n French. Generalized sense of “bulk, mass, quantity” (1620s) developed from that of “bulk or size of a book” (1520s), again following the sense evolution in the French word.

      Thanks to: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=volume&searchmode=none

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